DisableMyCable.com
Free and cheap TV without Cable or Satellite

Roku: My Number One Pick for Cable Cutters

By Brian Shim | Updated 
11/22/2021
Roku Ultra
Roku Ultra 2018

Roku is my #1 streaming player recommendation for cable-cutters looking for an easy way to watch content from the Internet on their TVs. While Amazon Fire TV is also great, Roku is probably the best choice for most people.

Disclosure: Some of the links on this page are affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission at no extra cost to you. I test or research each product or service before endorsing. This site is not owned by any retailer or manufacturer. I own this site and the opinions expressed here are mine. As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

What is a Roku?

Roku comes in several versions but basically, it is a small black box or stick that comes with a remote control and power adapter. Roku connects to the Internet through your home’s Wi-Fi network (some models also have Ethernet connector), so you need an Internet connection to use it.

Roku Ultra with accessories
Roku Ultra with accessories

Roku allows you to watch paid and free streaming services from the Internet such as Netflix, Sling, Disney+, HBO Max, Hulu, and YouTube on your TV.

When Roku first came out, there was a lot of misunderstanding as to what it was, with many folks thinking it was a free replacement for traditional cable TV. It is not an exact replacement for cable. It allows you to watch some free content from the Internet (like YouTube) on your TV, as well as subscription content such as HBO Max, Netflix, and Hulu. Much of this paid content is cheaper than a cable TV contract and usually requires no long-term commitment.

Also, understand that the Roku itself is not a DVR; it doesn’t record video, although there are some paid services on Roku that offer recording capability.

If you already have a “smart TV”, you might not need a Roku. Your smart TV already does a lot of what the Roku does.

All current Roku models only have HDMI output, so they won’t work with an old tube-type TV. See this article if you have an old tube TV that you want to use with Roku.

Trying Roku

Readers have asked me if they need to cancel their existing cable or satellite service to use a Roku. The answer is definitely "no"! Many people use cable/satellite along with a Roku.

Most TVs have several HDMI inputs. Just plug your Roku into an unused HDMI input and use your TV's remote control to switch between cable/satellite and Roku.

Content

Roku has the largest number of “channels” to choose from among all of the mainstream set-top boxes. Some offer free content, many offer content that you have to pay for. These are not the same as cable TV channels. Some of the content is on-demand rather than live, so it’s like renting from a video rental store.

Roku Channel
Roku Channels

Roku has a ton of channels with free content. Here are some free channels that I would recommend:

  • Pluto TV features over two hundred specialized channels of TV and movie content. While many of the other services are on-demand, Pluto resembles cable or broadcast TV in that the content is always streaming and you just watch what's playing at the moment. Just like cable and broadcast, there are commercials, but it’s one of the best sources of free video online.
  • Crackle offers a few “B-level” and mostly “C-level” older movies for free with ads. I already offer this channel on my Internet remote. It’s worth keeping.
  • Popcorn Flix is a free movie channel like Crackle (with ads), except that we’re talking about “C-level” and “D-level” movies here. I mean, I hadn’t even heard of any of them. They look like they went straight to video. Still, it’s free, so what the heck, I’ll keep it.
  • YouTube (the regular old free version, not to be confused with the pay version, YouTube TV) is my favorite source for free video content. It’s available on all current-generation Roku devices and some older models.

So, out of the box, you can watch tons of free content without paying a dime, as long as you know which channels to look for.

Setup

Physically hooking up your Roku is pretty easy. Plug in the power adapter to the wall, and connect the other end to your Roku. Then, plug in an HDMI cable (not included!) to your Roku and your TV.

Setting up your passwords is more of a pain. You will need to select your Wi-Fi network and enter your password using the dreaded letter-picker and remote control:

Roku letter picker
The dreaded letter-picker

Then you’ll have to create a Roku account if you don’t already have one. One annoying thing is that it asks for your credit card information, even if you never plan to purchase any paid programming.

Note: Carefully follow the step-by-step setup instructions. Do not Google "Roku setup" on your computer or phone and start registering at the first website that shows up. There are scammers out there collecting "registration" fees when it should be totally free!

For every streaming service that you have (such as Netflix, Hulu, and so forth), you’ll have to go through the drill of authorizing your account, usually by getting a code from the Roku and entering it on your computer or phone. But, it’s a one-time deal. You won’t have to do it again.

Voice Search

If you’ve ever had to use the cumbersome letter-picker to spell out the name of a movie you’re looking for, you know why voice search is so helpful. It lets you simply say what you’re looking for into the remote mic instead of having to select each letter with the remote control and the Roku will find out which streaming services it is on, i.e., Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, etc. Amazon Fire TV also has this feature.

Note, the Roku Express and Premiere models do not have remotes with built-in voice search microphone. But, if you don’t have a model with voice search, you can use the Roku app on your phone to and speak your commands into the app instead of the remote.

Roku gives search results without playing favorites to particular streaming services, while Amazon heavily emphasizes Amazon sources in its search results of course.

Roku search results
Roku searches give you results from a variety of content providers.

Remote Control Headphone Output

One feature unique to some Roku models (Roku Ultra) is headphone output in the remote control. This allows you to listen to the TV using headphones so you don’t disturb other people in the room, neighbors, etc. If you need this feature, it works well, and none of the other boxes have it! It does cause your remote to eat up batteries if you use it a lot though.

Recording

The Roku itself does not record video. However, many streaming apps such as YouTube TV, Sling, etc. have cloud-based DVR functionality.

If you really want to record streaming video from your Roku to your computer, check out PlayOn.tv. For about $40/year, you can record your favorite streaming shows to your computer.

Mirroring Your iOS or Android Device

In late 2020, Roku released a software update that enabled Apple AirPlay to work in select 4K Roku models such as the Roku Ultra. This feature allows you to mirror your iOS device's screen to your TV, enabling you to watch almost any content on your iPhone on your TV. It works great! These are the Roku models that support AirPlay:

  • Roku Ultra (I have tested the 2018 Ultra)
  • Roku Streambar
  • Roku Smart Soundbar
  • Roku Streaming Stick+
  • Roku Premiere
  • Roku TV (select models only)

Previously, AirPlay was pretty much the only reason I owned an Apple TV box. With this Roku software release, I'm packing up my Apple TV into my closet and solely using my Roku!

Roku can mirror the screen of Android devices More info on mirroring from Android or Windows to Roku here.

Streaming from USB Stick

Roku devices with standard USB ports, such as the Roku 3 and Roku Ultra, have the ability to play video, music, and photos from USB storage devices such as hard drives or flash sticks.  Simply plug in the USB storage device and the Roku Media Player app should appear (if not, you can download it).

Roku 3 playing from USB stick
Roku 3 playing from USB stick

This is great for viewing videos you already own.  Or, you can use it to show photos from your last vacation!

The one caveat is that the video file types that this will work are limited to .MKV, .M4V, .MP4, and .MOV. While many videos on the web are of these formats, many videos that you might have may not be (such as .MPG, DV-RMS video files from the old Windows Media Center and so on). 

So, if your files are in the right format, this could be a really cool and dead simple way to watch video that you already own on your Roku!

Using Roku as a Spare Cable / Satellite Box

Several readers with pay satellite or cable services have asked me if they can use a Roku to watch DirecTV, Xfinity, etc. on a second TV without having to rent another expensive decoder box from the provider.

As far as I can tell, for DirecTV, the answer is “no”. There is a DIRECTV NOW service with the Roku app, but that is separate from DirecTV, and DirecTV customers can’t use the app without subscribing.

Xfinity does have a beta Roku app that lacks some features but is still usable.

Spectrum TV does have a Roku app that allows you to watch your content using a Roku, but only when connected to your home’s Internet (i.e., you can’t use it in a hotel, for example). So in this case you could use it as a substitute for a cable box.

Since this site is about cutting cable and satellite, I don’t subscribe to any paid satellite or cable TV services, so anyone who does, please chime in on the comments below to correct or clarify anything I’ve said about this! 

Roku vs. Other Streaming Boxes

Roku advantages

  • Has the most channels out of all of the mainstream set-top boxes.
  • Roku Ultra has headphone output in remote control
  • Easy to use
  • Roku Express+ 2018 edition (note the “plus” and the 2018) will work with old tube TVs with composite video input
  • Select 4K Roku devices (like the Roku Ultra) have Apple AirPlay built in, allowing you to mirror your iOS device's screen to your TV

Roku disadvantages

  • No native web browser

For most people, Roku is my recommended streaming player. It has the most apps and is the easiest to use.  If you like using Alexa or need a web browser on your TV, then Amazon Fire TV might be best.

Which Roku Should I Get?

If you think Roku is right for you, you might be wondering, “Which one should I get?” It’s one of the most common questions people ask me, especially since Roku exploded their product lineup into a confusing mix of boxes and streaming sticks. Here are some guidelines:

  • If you have an old tube TV, the only Roku that will work for you is the Roku Express+ 2018 (note the plus at the end, and it MUST be the classic 2018 version! The newer version does not have analog outputs!) Your TV will need to have composite video inputs (round and usually colored yellow, white, and red).
  • I would avoid the regular Roku Express and Premiere, since those don’t have voice remote.
  • I would avoid the regular Roku Streaming Stick, because it can’t do 4K. Even if your TV doesn’t do 4K now, you could just get the Roku Premiere+ for the same cost, and that does support 4K.  So, that eliminates the Streaming Stick.
  • If you need headphones in the remote for private listening, go with the Roku Ultra.
  • If you need an Ethernet port (i.e., you don’t have WiFi), go with the Roku Ultra.

To summarize, my recommended Roku models are:

  • Express+ 2018 (not the latest version) if you have a tube TV. Look for the red, white, and yellow cables on the box.
  • Streaming Stick+ if you want a good mid-level solution and can’t afford an Ultra.
  • Roku Ultra if you can afford it.

Note, you will need a separate Roku box for each TV in your home.

If you’re ready to take the plunge, you can buy a Roku on Amazon:

Only the Roku Express+ 2018 edition will work with older TV’s because it has composite video output (look for the red, white, and yellow cables on the box):

Note, you'll have to look under "other sellers" on Amazon since this is an older model.

What do you think of your Roku? Questions? Please leave a comment below. – Brian

Did You Like This Article?

Brian Shim, DisableMyCable.com
If you did, please share it and sign up for my email updates. I'll send you my new articles, no more than once a month.

Check out my other site, thefrugalnoodle.com, with ideas on saving money and living simply.

Ask a Question or Tell Me Your Story

If you have a question about this article, leave a comment below. I personally read and answer each one. If you want advice on TV reception, leave your zip code. 

When you comment, you'll automatically receive replies by email. Your email address will not be displayed.

I'd also love to hear how you're saving money on TV. Tell me your story!  Thanks! - Brian
Subscribe
Notify of
guest

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

82 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Jeff Snodgrass
1 year ago

I have three Roku Express devices purchased in May 2019. A couple of months ago they started loosing sound and required a power cycle to get the sound to come back. Looking at Roku's customer pages, hundreds of others have this same problem and Roku's only response is to power cycle the unit. I do not recommend purchasing anything Roku as customer support is non-existent. BTW, it does not appear to be isolated to the Express as all Roku devices have experienced this problem.

rita52012
rita52012
1 year ago

Hi Brian, another question. We had gotten a Roku streaming Stick to use with our new TV, but returned it. We will get an Ultra instead. While trying to set up the streaming stick we were prompted to set up an account. Why do we have to do that? We didn't have to have an account with the older ones that we are still using.I definitely will not be giving them my credit card number.

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  rita52012

Hi Rita,

You should be able to log in using your existing Roku account. You shouldn't need to create a new account.

Best,
Brian

rita52012
rita52012
1 year ago

Have 2 roku devices connected to two older tvs that work fine. Just bought an LG 4K smart tv and the salesperson said we didn't need a Roku device bc it's already on this tv. This is NOT a Roku TV. We can still stream Amazon and Netflix, but it doesn't have a Roku menu. Do we need to get another Roku device to connect to this tv to get the same programs?And why do we need to "sign up"? We didn't have to do it before. I really don't want to give them my credit card number.What's that about? We still have the other two TVs connected.Not really sure what to do.

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  rita52012

Hi Rita,

It sounds like you have a smart TV with built-in apps, but it is not a Roku TV.

If it's not a true Roku TV, then yes, you'll have to buy a separate Roku if you want all of the Roku apps.

There should be no sign up!!!! That is a huge scam going around now. Do not give your credit card number during signup for Roku!

Best,
Brian

GaryMak
GaryMak
1 year ago

All this talk about "cut the cable." I'm afraid I don't get it. Cutting cable means just "cable TV?" But you still need "cable" i.e., broadband. And Comcast and others offer packages that make their "triple play" often CHEAPER than just buying 2 of the 3 packages. Sooo, if I "cut the TV cable" and go "cable free" - wooo-hooo! yeah! - my bill actually goes up...! So, I guess I'm not getting all the hoopla about "cutting TV cable." Not worth it..... and then there's the price of all the add on services.... Soooo, I cut my cable TV, my overall broadband bill goes up, now I need to pay extra for all the streaming services.... I'm trying to do the math here, but something isn't adding up......

Now, if Roku would work with BROADCAST TV if I don't have any internet/or TV, then that's another matter entirely. But if not, well, I can't really "cut the cable" with Roku, and so much for being able to use Roku on vacation at the beach house....(unless it already has cable, in which case I'm paying a fortune in monthly fees just for the occasional use...)

No, I don't think "cut the cable" actually works out.... but somebody, please check the math. Maybe I'm missing something. Thanks!

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  GaryMak

Hi Gary,

Yes, it's true that cable companies are heavily promoting cable TV by offering discounts (and even giving it away or lowering overall price) with their internet service... in the short run. If that's the case, by all means, get cable TV while it reduces your bill! Usually what happens is that eventually the "promotional" rate goes away and you're left with a higher bill a year or two later. At that time, you can cut cable TV and start saving.

There are still lots of folks who save money by cutting cable TV from day one. In my area, adding cable TV to internet adds $45 (not including taxes and fees) to the monthly internet bill the first year. After that, the cost goes higher, so cutting it makes even more sense.

Best,
Brian

GaryMak
GaryMak
1 year ago
Reply to  Brian

I will check this out. Thanks. Some day in the near future, when I'm feeling energetic and feisty and have the time, I'm going to call them and talk about cutting cable TV and see what they offer me "to keep me as a valued customer..." Thanks. I'll try to make my way back here and let you know how it goes.

Tracy Lynn Powell
Tracy Lynn Powell
1 year ago

disablemycable.com needs to make note on their site that when connecting the Roku stick to older TVs, you must buy the Roku Express+ dated for (2018). The newer Roku Express+ does NOT have the composite wire harness the is needed to connect a/v wires. I made that mistake researching on Walmart website and had to return because is was false advertising. Very upset that I not only wasted my time driving to the store to return item and not having it in stock, ordered thru Roku.com. But I couldn’t watch any TV since disconnecting cable service on a separate TV in my house.

Brian
1 year ago

Hi Tracy,

Thanks for the head's up on this! Wow, this is a very confusing thing for Roku to do; I'm quite disappointed in how they handled this. I'll update my article. Sorry you had to go through the hassle of returning it.

Best,
Brian

Susie
Susie
1 year ago

Hi Brian thank you for the article. Sorry for the following stupid question but i am so confused about cable cutting. I have a 2015 Samsung smart TV obviously it has apps for hulu/amazon/netflix, etc. but not some others you've mentioned but i have Cable (Comcast) as we like to switch around the channel and watch "live" TV (but have started watching a lot more Amazon movies since there's nothing on TV) we like to watch a lot of sports and news channels like CNN and Fox news. Comcast employee recently told us we can use Roku in place of renting their cable boxes which would save us monthly charges but i don't understand...if my Smart TV has apps, how am i saving unless i just use Roku in place of renting their boxes? Does Roku have a lot more apps than my Samsung Smart TV? I guess i should cut cable but i really have to figure all of this out before i do. Only thing i don't like about Hulu/Amazon/Netflix, etc. is sifting through content instead of just clicking through live streaming. Sorry for such a long question!!

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  Susie

Hi Susie,

Those are good questions. What you said about the Roku in place of the box rental is correct. You would just save on the box rental cost because you could use the Comcast Roku app instead (but be sure to look at the reviews to make sure it works well).

And yes, the Roku does have a lot more apps than your smart TV.

Best,
Brian

Linda Mann
Linda Mann
1 year ago

Also...i use an inside antenna for my tv. I get all the local channels. Will the roku make me loose the local antenna channels im getting now? Thanks again!

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  Linda Mann

Hi Linda,

No, the Roku is totally separate from your antenna. You won't lose any broadcast channels if you get a Roku.

Thanks,
Brian

Linda Mann
Linda Mann
1 year ago

At the moment i only have my android phone. I will get cable as well when i buy a roku. Dont we all have wifi? I dont understand when you said something about "if" we have wifi. Thank you!

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  Linda Mann

Hi Linda,

"Internet Access" and "Wi-Fi" often go together, but they are two different things. Not everyone with Internet access has Wi-Fi. Internet access gets the Internet to your home. Wi-Fi makes it wireless within your home. Some people just have wired Internet plugged into an ethernet port of a desktop computer, although that is getting more and more rare.

To sum up, most people with Internet Access also have Wi-Fi, but not all.

Best,
Brian

badhika srikanth
badhika srikanth
1 year ago

Does Roku device work in India ?

Brian
1 year ago

Hi Badhika,

Roku will work in India, but many of the apps won't work outside of the U.S.A, unfortunately.

Best,
Brian

Steve
Steve
1 year ago

Brian, is there a limit on the number of roku devices per IP?

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  Steve

Hi Steve,

It looks like the max number of roku devices is not limited by IP address, but by max six per account:
https://community.roku.com/t5/Roku-Developer-Program/How-many-roku-player-can-i-link-to-one-account/td-p/211776

Best,
Brian

Gretta
Gretta
1 year ago

We have two smart tvs (smamsung & roku) and they have roku app on them already - do we still need the roku box? And if not can we purchase the voice remote sepreatly to simplfy our searching of content?

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  Gretta

Hi Greta,

You do not need the Roku box if you have Roku on your TV (at least until your TV is not able to handle the latest version of Roku software).

According to this article, the Roku remote will work with a Roku TV:
https://community.roku.com/t5/Getting-Started-Setup-How-to/Using-Roku-App-on-Samsung-TV-s/td-p/518847

According to this article, the Roku remote will work with a Saumsung TV with the Roku app, but it sounds like the integration is not nearly as good:
https://community.roku.com/t5/Getting-Started-Setup-How-to/Using-Roku-App-on-Samsung-TV-s/td-p/518847

I'd say, purchase one for your Roku TV and test it on the Samsung before buying another.

Best,
Brian

HankDYank
HankDYank
1 year ago

OK, i'm an old guy who's leary of technology. MY questions are: (1)With WiFi will i still be able to get local channels (CBS, NBC, ABC {Jeopardy in particular) and local Fox news? (2) Disney Streaming (I'm not too sure what "Streaming" means) We have Comcast/Xfinity for Internet & TV and live in zip code 06359[North Stonington, CT]. Can you keep it simple enough for me to understand? Right now we're paying $190/Mo. Being retired that's a lot of money!

Brian
1 year ago
Reply to  HankDYank

Hi Hank,

"Streaming" refers to content that you get over the Internet (i.e., what you call Wi-Fi). Usually you have to pay a monthly subscription fee which allows you to watch TV and movies on your phone or computer. To watch these on your TV, you'll either need a "smart" TV or purchase a streaming player like a Roku (which is one that I recommend).

There are many streaming services. Some of the most popular are here:
https://www.disablemycable.com/streaming-services/

If you live in a big city, odds are that you can get most of the major networks (ABC, CBS, NBC) for free using an indoor antenna (though outdoor is best). However, some experimentation with antenna position will be necessary.

Fox News is not available using an antenna however. For that, you'd need to subscribe to a streaming service such as ATT NOw (https://www.atttvnow.com/), Hulu with Live TV, or YouTube TV.

Best,
Brian

Alan Brock
Alan Brock
1 year ago
Reply to  HankDYank

Hi Hank, I managed to get Jeopardy by installing a separate Network app. Since where I live Jeopardy is on NBC all I did was look on the Roku website for that network and I installed it on my Roku. Any network that has a separate app can be installed on a Roku and since it was free it was even better. Just remember to use the LIVE button when you want to watch the network live, otherwise they shows might just be per-recorded.

XenaBard
XenaBard
1 year ago

I got rid of cable a few years ago bc it got to the point where i just couldn’t afford it! I have been streaming Netflix, Hulu, Acorn, Britbox... I just checked the Roku channel & found an old program that I really loved (Cold Case) so I decided to check it out.

So... approximately four days ago, I began streaming Cold Case on Roku. There were the requisite interruptions for commercials - LOTS OF THEM, but...OK. The VERY SAME ADS ran back to back during the same commercial break! Note to advertisers: you ensure that I will NOT buy your product or brand by bugging me with annoying, long and/or repetitive ads! Especially commercials that would insult the intelligence of a slug!

The following day, it seemed like the program intervals were getting shorter & the interruptions more frequent. I thought it was my imagination. Thatquickly? Come on!

The day after that, I realized that the programming was definitely getting shorter while the commercial breaks were coming more & more frequently... and getting longer. Last night, there were barely two minutes left to the program, but a commercial break was shoved in anyway. I turned it off. I am not desperate enough to watch ads when the payoff is the final 90 seconds of the episode.

Today, I started watching Cold Case. The formatting is rote by now. Before the program even starts it’s mandatory to sit through commercials. Not interested! So, I got up to brush my teeth, comb my hair, etc. The washroom is close enough to allow me to listen for programming so I am not missing anything. I wasn’t gone but a few minutes, yet, they were already into yet ANOTHER commercial break! That’s just awful.

Oh, the viewer quickly learns not to back it up to watch something missed, bc you get stuck with watching another block of ads even if you just got done watching a whole block before you backed it up. It’s just not worth the hassle.

At the rate this is going pretty soon the majority of viewing will be ads with momentary breaks for the the show. As in: 20 minutes of Cold Case thrown into 40 minutes of ads.

I don’t mind reasonable ad breaks. My first day tuned in to Roku, the commercials preceded the program, which was my cue to leave the room for a doggie potty break, bathroom break, chores, whatever. But when the interruptions are so often and so repetitive that the program starts to make no sense, I‘m outta here.

This is a pattern i experienced with Hulu. Throw in more & more ads until the viewer becomes so frustrated & annoyed that they will pay to eliminate commercials. Except that viewers on fixed incomes, elderly, disabled, or whatever, can only afford that so many times. YouTube? They want money now. Netflix keeps increasing the membership price while decreasing desirability of programs available to stream. If there is a movie or program I want to watch, Netflix doesn’t have it. Otherwise, I wouldn’t be looking to supplement Netflix with all of these other services. At some point soon, cable will be more affordable and that’s crazy!!

Donna Harvey
Donna Harvey
1 year ago

We love the ROKU. Our favorite is Philo. It gives you live TV and major channels like Hallmark and LIfetime and so much more. We only watch about four hours per day and find that it uses all our allotted time up in the first week with HuesNet. What can we do, they throttle our service? We won't give up Philo, but it not so great when it takes over three hours to watch a movie! Please help.

Molina
Molina
2 years ago

Good article. It appears most flat screen TVs are already smart enabled but not all TV brands offer the integrated Roku platform operating system. These Smart TVs use other platforms such as Android TV, webOS, Tizen, SmartCast, etc. On my older flat screen 'dumb TV', I have used the external Roku box. I think Roku platform is one of the better ones, because they offer so much content.

MY QUESTION: If I already have a Smart TV with another OS smart tv platform, can I still connect an 'external] Roku box to that TV? If so, I would have two operating smart TV platforms on the TV? Again, I would want to use the Roku platform (via external box), and not the default that's already included with the smart TV.

Brian
2 years ago
Reply to  Molina

Hi Molina,

Great question! Yes, if you already have a Smart TV, you can definitely still plug in a Roku or other streaming player to any available HDMI input of the TV. It's not a problem!

Best,
Brian

John
John
2 years ago

How do you communicate with others while on a Roku device? Email? Texting? Messaging? Google Hangouts? Browser? Google Voice? Forget it.

Frank
Frank
2 years ago

Hello!!! I have a question and I want to make sure. I currently have spectrum on one tv and Roku on the other tv. If I cancel my tv cable subscription but keep my internet and buy another Roku device, will I be able to see all my spectrum channels or some of them only?

Brian
2 years ago
Reply to  Frank

Hi Frank,

If you cancel the cable TV portion of your service, you won't be able to see any channels that require a Spectrum login. But, there are lots of other services, both free and paid, which are available:
https://www.disablemycable.com/streaming-services/

Best,
Brian

Oliver William
Oliver William
2 years ago

Awesome information. It is very good and interesting article. It’s one of the most common questions people ask me, especially since Roku exploded their product lineup into a confusing mix of boxes and streaming sticks. Here are some guidelines:

If you have an old tube TV, the only Roku that will work for you is the Roku Express+ (note the plus at the end!)
I would avoid the regular Roku Express and Premiere, since those don’t have voice remote.
I would avoid the regular Roku Streaming Stick, because it can’t do 4K. Even if your TV doesn’t do 4K now, you could just get the Roku Premiere+ for the same cost, and that does support 4K. So, that eliminates the Streaming Stick.
I will share in this post. Thank you.

Brian
2 years ago
Reply to  Oliver William

Thanks for commenting Oliver! I'm glad you found this article useful!

Best,
Brian

James Ryan
James Ryan
2 years ago

I had cable and testing Roku it was great especially with ESPN, however i cancelled my cable and upgraded my internet speed but now no ESPN as it says I’m not authorized. Any ideas why?

Brian
2 years ago
Reply to  James Ryan

Hi James,

I believe the ESPN app requires that you have a cable login. It's also available on several streaming services, but these are not free:
https://www.disablemycable.com/streaming-services/

Best,
Brian

transplantwest
transplantwest
2 years ago

I have thee different models of roku. Oldest is a tube tv compatible (yes no comment) one is the model before express and the third streaming stick. Spectrum kicks me out of the spectrum app, sometimes all the way out to the roku screen, at the SAME time on the same day every week, give or take 35-40 mins. Here are the times sunday nights (worse in prime viewing season) 10-10:40 pm. Weekdays 5:45-6:30 am and 4- 4:30 weekdays. The craziest part of this is, the older roku gets kicked out less, is just super slow loading. I'll deal with the older tv. Do you have any idea why it would do this at the same time everyday? Roku says its Spectrum, Spectrum says it's roku or schedules someone to come to my house who just tries to upgrade my equipment for a monthly rental fee.

Btw... this does not happen if I'm on netflix or any other channel.... even a super cool free one that just plays episode after episode of this old house !

Brian
2 years ago
Reply to  transplantwest

Sorry, I have no experience with this. Try asking this Facebook group:
https://www.facebook.com/groups/rokurocks/

Brian

Related Articles

My Favorite Indoor Antennas

As an Amazon Associate, I earn from qualifying purchases. This site is not owned by any retailer or manufacturer. This is an independent review site that receives compensation from the retailer or manufacturer (at no extra cost to you) when you purchase through the affiliate links on this site. I personally test and/or research each product or service before endorsing it.

Search This Site

82
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x
linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram